Psychoeducational Assessments, ADHD and Autism

After a few weeks away from the office things are back to usual ...almost. Office hours are available in both the Burnaby and Vancouver locations for assessments, including Psychoeducational assessments, neuropsychological assessments, diagnostic assessments for both Autism Spectrum Disorder and Aspergers Disorder (which meet the Ministery requirements in British Columbia for private assessments of ASD) and related diagnostic work. Please feel free to contact the office, however the schedule is still rather full and it can often take until the weekend before youer call is answered. An initial contact through email is welcome at relatedminds@gmail.com, however if you do contact the office through email please do not include any personal information you would not want shared. People make mistakes emailing, sometimes emailing to the wrong address, so make a more general inquiry first.

A number of people want to kniow how quickly a psychoeducational assessment can be completed. Usually it takes 2 days of face to face testing with the student. There are additional items to be completed, however those can often be done on line or at home. So, two days of actual testing. Usually 3-4 hours each day. The report is usually done within the next ten days. This is a much shorter time than you will find elsewhere.  Appointments can usually be made within the next 2-3 weeks.

Costs of psychoeducational assessments average around $2,400.00, but can be more if additional testing needs to be donne.  Payments are usually made as follows: Payment for the three  hours of testing time scheduled is made before an appointment for the assessment can be made. Cancellations must be made 72 hours in advance, as a large block of time is scheduled. At the initial session 50% of the fee is due, and at the time you recieve the report the remaining 50% is due. Payments can be made in the office by Mastercard or VisISA, or on line using other credit cards or a back card. Checks are also accepted.

Assessments for Autism Spectrun Disorder. The cost of an ASD asseswsment ranges from $2,600.00 to $3,200. The final cost is dependant upon what the assessment calls for. Some children need both an ASD assessment for diagnosis (using the ADOS and ADI-R) AND a Psychoeducational Assessment in order for the school to set up an appropriate Individual Education Plan. You need a Psychoeducational Assessment before an IEP can be completed. Sometimes the school can or already has provided that service. With younger children a medical doctor's report and a report from a Speech and Language Pathologist  must be part of the assessment to meet the needs of the Ministry. Those are obtained seperately and are then used as part of the final process by the psychologist.

Getting an assessment does not automatically lead to a diagnosis of ASD, nor does it automatically lead to Ministry funding. Just as getting a Psychoeducational Assessment does not necessarily lead to an IEP or services from the schools.

Finally, often parents and adults are seen for ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) assessments. These vary in cost, as they may include a psychoeducational assessment, or may not. These are arranged individually.

If you are exprecting to use any assessment in a legal situation (often adults with ADHD want an assessment due to work difficulties) the assessment process is different. It requires using different tools, and gathering additional information. You need to be clear on the purpose of the assessment from the start.

I aklways suggest that parents write out what they want an assessment to do. What should it provide? Assessments are always done in order to answer a question. "Why doesn't John read as well as he thinks?"  "Why can't Nancy write? She reads above grade level but can't seem to write out answers to questions?" It's always good to spend time thinking out these questions.

ADHD assessment and treatment also need to address specific deficits and needs. An assessment is much better at answering how best to reach a goal, rather than asking what goals should we have.

Dr. Jasmes Roche
relatedminds.com
www.relatedminds.com

Offices in Burnaby and Vancouver

Think Your Child Has ADHD?

WebMD has an excellent and short video on the initial steps to diagnosing ADHD in children. This ADHD video on diagnosis also addresses the use of medication for children and teens with ADHD. As usual, medication is not the first step one should necessarily take after finding your child has ADHD. Common, well known behavioural interventions in the home and classroom are the recommended first step, and these remain important parts of treatment for ADHD no matter if you make the choice to use medication or not. Certainly it is clear that parent education, student/child psychoeducation and behavioural therapy and ADHD Coaching are step one and are always part of any good treatment plan.

Here is the link to this ADHD video: Think Your Child May Have ADHD? Learn More - Watch WebMD Video http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/video/diagnosing-adhd

For more information on the diagnosis of ADHD in children, adolescents or adults, see my web page at www.relatedminds.com ADHD can be diagnosed by either a medical doctor or registered psychologist with appropriate training and experience. An initial medical exam is always necessary to rule out possible disorders that cause the behaviours of concern that may not be ADHD. To find a registered psychologist who can diagnose ADHD contact the British columbia Psychological Association.

More information about my practice can be found at: "ADHD Assessment and Treatment" are written by Dr. Jim Roche. These autism notes are not meant to provide a guide to either diagnosis or treatment. For information on diagnosis and treatment contact your medical doctor or a registered/licensed psychologist for an appointment and assessment.

Information about Dr. Roche's services can be found at these addresses: Relatedminds: http://www.relatedminds.com
ADHD Help BC: http://www.adhdhelp.ca
At Psychology Today: http://therapists.psychologytoday.com/rms/70682
At the BCPA website: http://psychologists.bc.ca/users/jimroche
At CounsellingBC: http://www.counsellingbc.com/listings/JRoche.htm
At Psyris: http://psyris.com/drjimroche

 KEYWORDS: ADD, ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, ADD Coaching, ADHD Coaching, ADHD Coaching Vancouver, ADHD Coaching Burnaby, ADHD Coaching Langley, ADHD Coaching Coquitlam, Psychoeducational Assessment, Learning Disability, ADHD Diagnosis

Ups and Downs of ADHD

This short blog article looks at the ups and downs of ADHD, how individuals with ADHD can have variations in their abilities to focus, concentratrate and plan, and can have variations in mood.

Individuals with ADHD often have "ups and downs" from one day to another. A good day, then a bad day. Sometimes it's an up and down during the same day. For anyone with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADD as it is sometimes called) the first issue is to make sure, if these ups and downs are frequent and severe, that you do not have a co-morbid mood disorder. This is usually looked at during the initial ADHD diagnosis. Often a family doctor doesn't have the time or expertise to look at possible mood disorders, so a visit to a psychologist familiar with ADHD is suggested. (This is another reason to make sure, if you are using the services of an ADHD coach, that they are supervised by a licensed mental health professional and not simply working as a "certified coach" which is an unregistered/unlicensed and unregulated field in BC and most other provinces and states.)

The other issue is that often parents, teachers and co-workers (or worse yet, your boss!) take these ups and downs to mean that 1) you CAN keep your symptoms under control and simply aren't trying hard enough, or 2) see, there really is no such thing as ADHD, it's just an excuse. Both of these are untrue and counter to the scientific evidence, and the ups and downs ......they're proof of the real nature of ADHD as well.

ADHD symptoms do vary, they vary at different times and of course in different situations. The daily fluctuations may be related to the daily activity you are engaged in. Dr. Barkley says, "If the tasks required on a specific day demand lot's of self-control and organization as well as time management and persistence, then those days with A.D.H.D. will generally report that their symptoms are worse that day. If on the other hand, it is a vacation or weekend day and they could do more things they enjoyed, they often report their symptoms were less pronounced that day." (See Dr. Barkley's related article on the New York times Health page.)

So, if you need to focus on work that is difficult and holds little interest or reinforcement, expect problems. And if your going to an action movie after a quiet morning and lunch ...things will go well.  Novel situations go well much of the time, and do one-on-one encounters. The more planning and self-restraignt necessary, the less well it is going to go. All of this should make sense, knowing what ADHD is.

But there is also those days that just seem to go wrong. We start the day, some incident happens, anxiety builds and nothing seems to go right after that. We find ourselves in a downward spiral. Something we could do yesterday not becomes a difficult and sometimes  impossible task today. Again, to some this is proof that ADHD isn't real, or that you aren't trying hard enough.  Don't get caught in the definition others put on your behaviours based upon their preconceived (and wrong) ideas. It is simply the nature of ADHD to change like this.

What you need is a Plan B. Plan A  may not be going well, and it may not work out at all. So have a Plan B, a plan that gives you 1) A time to help yourself "switch mental sets," and change the way your brain is thinking and working (like taking a walk, having tea, doing a cross word puzzle or reading a book or listening to a podcast). Do something to change your mental direction. Maybe go to the gym. And then, 2) if you need it, spend time on an alternative but constructive activity. This might mean setting a timer and using the time to straighten out your papers, clean your office, get ten phone calls done.  What's important here is to have a structured Plan B and not to reinforce any avoiding behaviours - procrastination - that might be going on.  Keep a record of when and where this happens, and while you need a Plan B remember, your goal is to stick to Plan A. Ask yourself: "What about Plan A went wrong?" Was it where the activity/task took place, the time, what happened before or will happen after? If you have multiple experiences with Plan B - it's time to check in with your psychologist, doctor of mental health coach. But don't take changes in ability to be anything more than ADHD doing what ADHD does. Your question is: "What can I do to deal with this specific symptom of ADHD?" And then come up with a new and better Plan A AND Plan B!

For information concerning the services I provide for children, adolescents and adults with ADHD please visit my web page at www.relatedminds.com or www.adhdhelp.ca  In addition to working with individuals, providing diagnosis, treatment plans and coaching services, I also provide school based training and consultation services as well as work place services.